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ISL 2016

ISL 2016: Sahil Tavora's late strike helps FC Goa clinch nine-goal thriller against Chennaiyin FC

FC Goa beat Chennaiyin FC 5-4 in the highest-scoring match in the history of the ISL.

Sahil Tavora produced a gem of a finish, cutting in from the right and curling the ball past Karanjit Singh as FC Goa finished the Indian Super League on an excellent note, beating last-year’s champions Chennaiyin FC 5-4

The highest-scoring game in the history of ISL saw many twists and turns as five goals came in 40 minutes. FC Goa came back with a bang in the second half but a John Arne Riise penalty in the 86th minute leveled scores.

Tavora’s piece of magic deep into stoppage time helped the hosts bag three points but the win did not effect any changes in the table as Goa still finish last, and Chennayin, seventh. Sahil Tavora and Rafael Coelho got two goals each for Zico’s side.

The most frenetic first-half of the season brought as many as five goals with Chennaiyin finishing with the lead in the game. Jerry Lalrinzuala’s beautiful curling free-kick put his side in the lead, and Coelho brought Goa back in the contest by finishing Joffre’s superbly threaded pass.

The away side got their lead back after 13 minutes as the impressive Anirudh Thapa’s shot from close range was helped into the net by Goa keeper Laxmikanth Kattimani. It was 2-2 at 22 minutes with Joffre converting from the spot with absolute disdain.

Dudu’s powerful strike from just inside the area put Marco Matterazzi’s side in the lead again. The Nigerian striker could have had more as his 10th minute strike only found the post.

On the other side of the break, Goa had an excellent passage of play going early into the half. Chennaiyin could have stretched their lead had Gregory Arnolin not pulled off an outstanding goal-line clearance from Daniel Lahlimpuia’s shot.

The Guars rallied and Tavora made it 3-3 after tapping in Coelho’s deflected cut-back. With 15 minutes left for full-time, the sparse support went delirious as Coelho got his second. Yet again, the Brazilian striker showed terrific instinct to get on the end of a through ball. The Goan striker showed great composure to find the net.

The drama did not end there and a needless hand-ball in the box from Raju Gaikwad helped Chennaiyin equalise. Local boy Tavora, though, had other ideas and shot from a mighty difficult angle, and the ball struck the post and found its way into the net.

Brief scores:

FC Goa 5 (Rafael Coelho x 2, Sahil Tavora x 2, Joffre) beat Chennaiyin FC 4 (Jerry Lalrinzuala, Laxmikanth Kattimani (o.g), Dudu, John Arne Riise0

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