International Cricket

The cricket wrap: India Women defeat Sri Lanka to enter T20 Asia Cup final, and other top stories

Bengal staged an outstanding comeback against Mumbai in the Ranji Trophy while New Zealand Cricket will introduce 'concession substitutes'.

The big story: India Women complete their fourth win on the bounce

The Indian women’s team, under Harmanpreet Kaur, continued to impress and easily managed to down a hapless Sri Lanka by 59 runs in Bangkok on Thursday. India’s all-round game simply overpowered the Lankans, who were set a stiff target of 122 courtesy veteran Mithali Raj’s fighting half-century. Raj scored 62 from 59 balls and held the Indian innings together.

In reply, only two Sri Lankan batters got to double figures as they could come up with only 69 in their quota of overs for the loss of nine wickets. India play their final group match against Nepal on Friday, and have already qualified for the final. Kaur’s side have now made it four wins from four with the win.

Other top stories

  1. After getting shot out for 99 in the first innings, Bengal staged a remarkable fightback in their Ranji Trophy match against Mumbai to take a second innings lead in excess of 300. Captain Manoj Tiwary and Sudip Chatterjee scored hundreds for Bengal. 
  2. Ravichandran Ashwin revealed that a change in delivery stride and bowling action as the reason behind his outstanding displays over the last year. Ashwin currently heads the bowlers list in the International Cricket Council rankings. 
  3. Durham opener Keaton Jennings celebrated his call-up to the England side for their last two Tests against India with a punishing century against United Arab Emirates, representing England Lions. Keaton, the son of former South African coach Ray Jennings, has taken the place of injured opener Haseeb Hameed. 
  4. New Zealand cricket has promised to introduce “concussion substitutes” in this year’s domestic limited-overs competitions. The experiment has already been tested in Australia, where a like for like replacement will take the pitch if the medical team, midway through the game decides that the player is not fit. In New Zealand, it will be the 12th man who will take the field once given the go-ahead.
  5. The Kerala Cricket Association has issued a show cause notice to their star player Sanju Samson for violating the code of conduct during the Ranji Trophy matches this season. The KCA levied a number of allegations against the 21-year-old, including going missing from his hotel room and not being in his whites when he took the field in Cuttack while playing Tripura. 
  6. Sri Lanka captain Angelo Mathews and vice-captain Dinesh Chandimal have declared themselves fit for Sri Lanka’s tour of South Africa later in the month. Both players missed the Tests against Zimbabwe and the tri-series that followed.
  7. New Zealand have called up unknown pacer Lockie Ferguson for the upcoming Chappell-Hadlee series. Certain observers in the New Zealand cricket circles have stated that the 25-year-old, who can clock upto speeds in excess of 150 mph, brings back memories of pace great Shane Bond.
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Young Indians now like their traditional food with a twist

Indian food with international influences is here to stay.

With twenty-nine states and over 50 ethnic groups, India’s diversity is mind-boggling to most foreigners. This diversity manifests itself across areas from clothing to art and especially to food. With globalisation, growth of international travel and availability of international ingredients, the culinary diversity of India has become progressively richer.

New trends in food are continuously introduced to the Indian palate and are mainly driven by the demands of generation Y. Take the example of schezwan idlis and dosas. These traditional South Indian snacks have been completely transformed by simply adding schezwan sauce to them – creating a dish that is distinctly Indian, but with an international twist. We also have the traditional thepla transformed into thepla tacos – combining the culinary flavours of India and Mexico! And cous cous and quinoa upma – where niche global ingredients are being used to recreate a beloved local dish. Millennials want a true fusion of foreign flavours and ingredients with Indian dishes to create something both Indian and international.

So, what is driving these changes? Is it just the growing need for versatility in the culinary experiences of millennials? Or is it greater exposure to varied cultures and their food habits? It’s a mix of both. Research points to the rising trend to seek out new cuisines that are not only healthy, but are also different and inspired by international flavours.

The global food trend of ‘deconstruction’ where a food item is broken down into its component flavours and then reconstructed using completely different ingredients is also catching on for Indian food. Restaurants like Masala Library (Mumbai), Farzi Café (Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru) and Pink Poppadum (Bengaluru) are pushing the boundaries of what traditional Indian food means. Things like a kulcha pizza, dal chaawal cutlet and chutney foam are no longer inconceivable. Food outlets that stock exotic ingredients and brands that sell traditional Indian packaged snacks in entirely new flavours are also becoming more common across cities.

When it comes to the flavours themselves, some have been embraced more than others. Schezwan sauce, as we’ve mentioned, is now so popular that it is sometimes even served with traditional chakna at Indian bars. Our fascination with the spicy red sauce is however slowly being challenged by other flavours. Wasabi introduced to Indian foodies in Japanese restaurants has become a hit among spice loving Indians with its unique kick. Peri Peri, known both for its heat and tanginess, on the other hand was popularised by the famous UK chain Nandos. And finally, there is the barbeque flavour – the condiment has been a big part of India’s love for American fast food.

Another Indian snack that has been infused with international flavours is the beloved aloo bhujia. While the traditional gram-flour bhujia was first produced in 1877 in the princely state of Bikaner in Rajasthan, aloo bhujia came into existence once manufacturers started experimenting with different flavours. Future Consumer Limited’s leading food brand Tasty Treat continues to experiment with the standard aloo bhujia to cater to the evolving consumer tastes. Keeping the popularity of international flavours in mind, Tasty Treat’s has come up with a range of Firangi Bhujia, an infusion of traditional aloo bhujia with four of the most craved international flavours – Wasabi, Peri Peri, Barbeque and Schezwan.

Tasty Treat’s range of Firangi Bhujia has increased the versatility of the traditional aloo bhujia. Many foodies are already trying out different ways to use it as a condiment to give their favourite dish an extra kick. Archana’s Kitchen recommends pairing the schezwan flavoured Firangi Bhujia with manchow soup to add some crunch. Kalyan Karmakar sprinkled the peri peri flavoured Firangi Bhujia over freshly made poha to give a unique taste to a regular breakfast item. Many others have picked a favourite amongst the four flavours, some admiring the smoky flavour of barbeque Firangi Bhujia and some enjoying the fiery taste of the peri peri flavour.

Be it the kick of wasabi in the crunch of bhujia, a bhujia sandwich with peri peri zing, maska pav spiced with schezwan bhujia or barbeque bhujia with a refreshing cold beverage - the new range of Firangi Bhujia manages to balance the novelty of exotic flavours with the familiarity of tradition. To try out Tasty Treat’s Firangi Bhujia, find a store near you.

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This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Tasty Treat and not by the Scroll editorial team.