International Cricket

The cricket wrap: India Women defeat Sri Lanka to enter T20 Asia Cup final, and other top stories

Bengal staged an outstanding comeback against Mumbai in the Ranji Trophy while New Zealand Cricket will introduce 'concession substitutes'.

The big story: India Women complete their fourth win on the bounce

The Indian women’s team, under Harmanpreet Kaur, continued to impress and easily managed to down a hapless Sri Lanka by 59 runs in Bangkok on Thursday. India’s all-round game simply overpowered the Lankans, who were set a stiff target of 122 courtesy veteran Mithali Raj’s fighting half-century. Raj scored 62 from 59 balls and held the Indian innings together.

In reply, only two Sri Lankan batters got to double figures as they could come up with only 69 in their quota of overs for the loss of nine wickets. India play their final group match against Nepal on Friday, and have already qualified for the final. Kaur’s side have now made it four wins from four with the win.

Other top stories

  1. After getting shot out for 99 in the first innings, Bengal staged a remarkable fightback in their Ranji Trophy match against Mumbai to take a second innings lead in excess of 300. Captain Manoj Tiwary and Sudip Chatterjee scored hundreds for Bengal. 
  2. Ravichandran Ashwin revealed that a change in delivery stride and bowling action as the reason behind his outstanding displays over the last year. Ashwin currently heads the bowlers list in the International Cricket Council rankings. 
  3. Durham opener Keaton Jennings celebrated his call-up to the England side for their last two Tests against India with a punishing century against United Arab Emirates, representing England Lions. Keaton, the son of former South African coach Ray Jennings, has taken the place of injured opener Haseeb Hameed. 
  4. New Zealand cricket has promised to introduce “concussion substitutes” in this year’s domestic limited-overs competitions. The experiment has already been tested in Australia, where a like for like replacement will take the pitch if the medical team, midway through the game decides that the player is not fit. In New Zealand, it will be the 12th man who will take the field once given the go-ahead.
  5. The Kerala Cricket Association has issued a show cause notice to their star player Sanju Samson for violating the code of conduct during the Ranji Trophy matches this season. The KCA levied a number of allegations against the 21-year-old, including going missing from his hotel room and not being in his whites when he took the field in Cuttack while playing Tripura. 
  6. Sri Lanka captain Angelo Mathews and vice-captain Dinesh Chandimal have declared themselves fit for Sri Lanka’s tour of South Africa later in the month. Both players missed the Tests against Zimbabwe and the tri-series that followed.
  7. New Zealand have called up unknown pacer Lockie Ferguson for the upcoming Chappell-Hadlee series. Certain observers in the New Zealand cricket circles have stated that the 25-year-old, who can clock upto speeds in excess of 150 mph, brings back memories of pace great Shane Bond.
We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

Watch Ruchir's journey: A story that captures the impact of accessible technology

Accessible technology has the potential to change lives.

“Technology can be a great leveller”, affirms Ruchir Falodia, Social Media Manager, TATA CLiQ. Out of the many qualities that define Ruchir as a person, one that stands out is that he is an autodidact – a self-taught coder and lover of technology.

Ruchir’s story is one that humanises technology - it has always played the role of a supportive friend who would look beyond his visual impairment. A top ranker through school and college, Ruchir would scan course books and convert them to a format which could be read out to him (in the absence of e-books for school). He also developed a lot of his work ethos on the philosophy of Open Source software, having contributed to various open source projects. The access provided by Open Source, where users could take a source code, modify it and distribute their own versions of the program, attracted him because of the even footing it gave everyone.

That is why I like being in programming. Nobody cares if you are in a wheelchair. Whatever be your physical disability, you are equal with every other developer. If your code works, good. If it doesn’t, you’ll be told so.

— Ruchir.

Motivated by the objectivity that technology provided, Ruchir made it his career. Despite having earned degree in computer engineering and an MBA, friends and family feared his visual impairment would prove difficult to overcome in a work setting. But Ruchir, who doesn’t like quotas or the ‘special’ tag he is often labelled with, used technology to prove that differently abled persons can work on an equal footing.

As he delved deeper into the tech space, Ruchir realised that he sought to explore the human side of technology. A fan of Agatha Christie and other crime novels, he wanted to express himself through storytelling and steered his career towards branding and marketing – which he sees as another way to tell stories.

Ruchir, then, migrated to Mumbai for the next phase in his career. It was in the Maximum City that his belief in technology being the great leveller was reinforced. “The city’s infrastructure is a challenging one, Uber helped me navigate the city” says Ruchir. By using the VoiceOver features, Ruchir could call an Uber wherever he was and move around easily. He reached out to Uber to see if together they could spread the message of accessible technology. This partnership resulted in a video that captures the essence of Ruchir’s story: The World in Voices.

Play

It was important for Ruchir to get rid of the sympathetic lens through which others saw him. His story serves as a message of reassurance to other differently abled persons and abolishes some of the fears, doubts and prejudices present in families, friends, employers or colleagues.

To know more about Ruchir’s journey, see here.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Uber and not by the Scroll editorial team.