International Cricket

The cricket wrap: India A lose against England despite Dhoni's heroics, and other top stories

Mohammad Azharuddin filed his nomination for the post of HCA president while Gujarat dominated proceedings on the first day of the Ranji final against Mumbai.

The big news: Dhoni (doesn’t) finish off in style

Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s last match as the captain of an Indian team ended in a loss as England XI beat India A by three wickets in the first warm-up match at the Brabourne Stadium in Mumbai on Tuesday. After England opted to field after winning the toss, India A reached 304 in their 50 overs with Shikhar Dhawan and Yuvraj Singh hitting fifties and Ambati Rayudu getting a century. Dhoni showed sparks with the bat, scoring an unbeaten 40-ball 68 which included eight fours and two towering sixes.

However, Sam Billings knock of 93 proved to be the difference as England chased the target down with three wickets to spare. Kuldeep Yadav was the pick of the bowlers taking five wickets. In the end, it was an easy win for England. The second warm-up match will take place on January 12 at the same venue.

Other top stories:

  1. Gujarat bowled Mumbai out for 228 in the first innings of the Ranji Trophy final at Indore on Tuesday. Teenager Prithvi Shaw top scored with 71 for the defending champions. Gujarat were 2/0 at the close of play.
  2. Former Indian captain Mohammed Azharuddin filed his nomination for the post of Hyderabad Cricket Association president. The 52-year-old stated that the HCA “is in the doldrums” and that he wants to serve Hyderabad cricket.
  3. Pakistan pace legend Wasim Akram is in legal trouble after a sessions court in Karachi issued a bailable arrest warrant for missing 31 hearings of a case that he had filed against an army major. Akram had alleged that the armyman, Aminur Rehman had taken out a revolver and fired an open shot after the 47-year-old’s car collided with the latter’s.
  4. The Pakistan Cricket Board has lambasted the Federation for International Cricketers Association for advising players not to visit the country for security reasons. The PCB called FICA’s observation a “careless and cavalier approach to an issue of great importance”.
  5. Former West Indies cricketer Jimmy Adams is the new director of cricket at the West Indies Cricket Board, reported ESPNCricinfo. Adams replaced Richard Pybus, who opted to not renew his contract after serving for three years. 
  6. In yet another blow to Pakistan, wicketkeeper-batsman Safraz Ahmed will return to Pakistan to be with his ill mother, reported cricket.com.au. A day after fast bowler Mohammad Irfan returned to Pakistan following the death of his mother, Sarfraz will also go back after his mother was admitted to intensive care at a Karachi hospital. 
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