Australia in India

The sports wrap: Sri Lanka beat Australia off last ball in first T20I, and other top stories

India qualified for the ICC Women’s World Cup; PV Sindhu became the second Indian woman to break into the top-five of the BWF rankings.

The big story: Kapugedera’s boundary off last delivery hands Sri lanka thrilling victory

Chamara Kapugedera’s last-ball boundary helped Sri Lanka to a five-wicket win over Australia in the first Twenty20I at the MCG on Friday.

Chasing Australia’s target of 169, Sri Lanka were cruising with only 18 required off the last three overs and seven wickets to spare. Debutant Ashton Turner though helped stretch the game to the last over with two wickets in the 17th. Australia pounced on a nervous Sri Lanka lower-order as some tight bowling from Ashton Tye took the game to the final ball of the match.

With scores level, Tye could not deny the visitors as Kapugedera pulled off an fine cover-drive to complete a fine victory.

Earlier, star pacer Lasith Malinga had made a fine comeback to international cricket that saw scalp two wickets off consecutive balls. While he did not complete a hat-trick, he did manage to rattle the Aussies.

Asela Gunaratne was the top-scorer for Sri Lanka with 52 from 37 balls.

Other top stories

Cricket

  • India qualified for the ICC Women’s World Cup with a comprehensive nine-wicket win against Bangladesh in the ICC Women’s World Cup Qualifiers in Colombo on Friday.
  • Former India pacer S Sreesanth on Friday wrote to Vinod Rai, who heads the Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators of the Board of Control for Cricket in India, seeking permission to resume cricketing activities after four years away from the game, IANS reported.
  • Australia skipper Steve Smith and Shaun Marsh got their tour of India off to a solid start with fine centuries on day one of their warm-up game against India A in Mumbai on Friday. The duo’s effort helped Australia post 327/5 as the Indian bench strength was tested by the visitors.
  • BCCI’s Committee of Administrators, headed by former CAG Vinod Rai, on Friday held meeting where they discussed Deloitte’s audit report of various state associations and also met Justice RM Lodha panel secretary Gopal Shankarnarayan.
  • A five-wicket haul by Imran Tahir saw South Africa cruise to a 78-run win over New Zealand in the one-off Twenty20 in Auckland on Friday.

Tennis

  • Jo-Wilfred Tsonga beat Marin Cilic 7-6(8), 7-6(5) in the quarter-finals of the Rotterdam Open on Friday. Thomas Berdych also advanced to the semi-final stage with a 6-3, 6-3 win over Martin Klizan.

Football

  • Arsene Wenger on Friday hinted that he might not remain at Arsenal next season and would take a decision on his future in March or April, The Telegraph reported.
  • Gareth Bale is likely to make a return into the Real Madrid squad for their home against Espanyol on Saturday. The Welshman has been out of action since November last year.
  • Former DSK Shivajians coach Derrick Pereira was on Friday appointed as head coach of Churchill brothers club, PTI reported.

Table Tennis

  • India’s Sharath Kamal defeated World number 24 Yuto Muramatsu in the round of 16 at the ITTF India Open.

Badminton

  • Shuttler PV Sindhu became the second Indian woman to break into the top-five of the badminton singles world rankings. The Olympic silver medalist, who broke into the top-10 in 2013, achieved her career-best ranking of No. 5 on Thursday.

Chess

  • Grandmaster Dronavalli Harika and International Master Padmini Rout won tiebreaks in the second round and advanced to the last-16 stage of World Women’s Chess Championship.

Golf

  • Gaurika Bishnoi carded one-under 71 on the final day to clinch her maiden title in the Women’s Professional Golf Tour at the Royal Calcutta Golf Club in Kolkata on Friday.

Hockey

  • Delhi Waveriders jumped to third spot in the Hockey India League with a 6-1 win over Punjab Warriors on Friday.
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Modern home design trends that are radically changing living spaces in India

From structure to finishes, modern homes embody lifestyle.

Homes in India are evolving to become works of art as home owners look to express their taste and lifestyle through design. It’s no surprise that global home design platform Houzz saw over a million visitors every month from India, even before their services were locally available. Architects and homeowners are spending enormous time and effort over structural elements as well as interior features, to create beautiful and comfortable living spaces.

Here’s a look at the top trends that are altering and enhancing home spaces in India.

Cantilevers. A cantilever is a rigid structural element like a beam or slab that protrudes horizontally out of the main structure of a building. The cantilevered structure almost seems to float on air. While small balconies of such type have existed for eons, construction technology has now enabled large cantilevers, that can even become large rooms. A cantilever allows for glass facades on multiple sides, bringing in more sunlight and garden views. It works wonderfully to enhance spectacular views especially in hill or seaside homes. The space below the cantilever can be transformed to a semi-covered garden, porch or a sit-out deck. Cantilevers also help conserve ground space, for lawns or backyards, while enabling more built-up area. Cantilevers need to be designed and constructed carefully else the structure could be unstable and lead to floor vibrations.

Butterfly roofs. Roofs don’t need to be flat - in fact roof design can completely alter the size and feel of the space inside. A butterfly roof is a dramatic roof arrangement shaped, as the name suggests, like a butterfly. It is an inverted version of the typical sloping roof - two roof surfaces slope downwards from opposing edges to join around the middle in the shape of a mild V. This creates more height inside the house and allows for high windows which let in more light. On the inside, the sloping ceiling can be covered in wood, aluminium or metal to make it look stylish. The butterfly roof is less common and is sure to add uniqueness to your home. Leading Indian architecture firms, Sameep Padora’s sP+a and Khosla Associates, have used this style to craft some stunning homes and commercial projects. The Butterfly roof was first used by Le Corbusier, the Swiss-French architect who later designed the city of Chandigarh, in his design of the Maison Errazuriz, a vacation house in Chile in 1930.

Butterfly roof and cantilever (Image credit: Design Milk on Flickr.com)
Butterfly roof and cantilever (Image credit: Design Milk on Flickr.com)

Skylights. Designing a home to allow natural light in is always preferred. However, spaces, surrounding environment and privacy issues don’t always allow for large enough windows. Skylights are essentially windows in the roof, though they can take a variety of forms. A well-positioned skylight can fill a room with natural light and make a huge difference to small rooms as well as large living areas. However, skylights must be intelligently designed to suit the climate and the room. Skylights facing north, if on a sloping roof, will bring in soft light, while a skylight on a flat roof will bring in sharp glare in the afternoons. In the Indian climate, a skylight will definitely reduce the need for artificial lighting but could also increase the need for air-conditioning during the warm months. Apart from this cleaning a skylight requires some effort. Nevertheless, a skylight is a very stylish addition to a home, and one that has huge practical value.

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Floating staircase (Image credit: Design Milk on Flickr.com)
Floating staircase (Image credit: Design Milk on Flickr.com)

Exposed Brick Walls. Brickwork is traditionally covered with plaster and painted. However, ‘exposed’ bricks, that is un-plastered masonry, is becoming popular in homes, restaurants and cafes. It adds a rustic and earthy feel. Exposed brick surfaces can be used in home interiors, on select walls or throughout, as well as exteriors. Exposed bricks need to be treated to be moisture proof. They are also prone to gathering dust and mould, making regular cleaning a must.

Cement work. Don’t underestimate cement and concrete when it comes to design potential. Exposed concrete interiors, like exposed brick, are becoming very popular. The design philosophy is ‘Less is more’ - the structure is simplistic and pops of colour are added through furniture and soft furnishings.

Exposed concrete wall (Image Credit: Getty Images)
Exposed concrete wall (Image Credit: Getty Images)

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