Ranji Trophy

Ranji Trophy round-up: Pujara’s 182 props up Saurashtra, Binny ton takes Karnataka to 649

Vidarbha all-rounder Aditya Sarwate survived a head injury scare when he was hit by a bouncer during his side’s Group D match against Bengal.

Cheteshwar Pujara missed out on a second successive double hundred but his 182 went a long way in Saurashtra piling up a mammoth 570 in their first innings against Gujarat on the second day of their Group B encounter of the Ranji Trophy.

Starting the day at 115*, Pujara added 69 runs for the fifth wicket with Jaydev Shah (46) and 53 runs for the sixth wicket Prerak Mankad (62).

Pujara’s 182 came off 313 balls with 24 boundaries and was finally bowled by left-arm spinner Siddharth Desai.

Prerak played a breezy knock striking seven fours and a six in 77 balls. It was Chirag Jani’s unbeaten 46 that took Saurashtra past 550-run mark.

In reply, Gujarat were 45/0.

Brief Scores (Group B):
Saurashtra 1st Innings 570 (Cheteshwar Pujara 182, Snell Patel 156, Prerak Mankad 62, Siddharth Desai 4/154).
Haryana 223 (Harshal Patel 83; Aniket Chaudhary 3/37, Pankaj Singh 3/60) vs Rajasthan 74/7 (Amit Mishra 2/19).
Jammu and Kashmir 376 (Puneet Bisht 115, Shubham Khajuria 101, Varun Aaron 4/54) vs Jharkhand 220/5 (Nazim Siddiqui 70, Anand Singh 68; Parveez Rasool 2/65).

Vidarbha all-rounder survives head injury scare

Vidarbha all-rounder Aditya Sarwate survived a head injury scare when he was hit by a bouncer during his side’s Group D match against Bengal.

A rising delivery from debutant pacer Ishan Porel hit the batsman, forcing him to leave the field for some time.

Looking in sublime form en route to his third first-class half-century, the number seven batsman tried to pull the 19-year-old Bengal pacer in the second ball of the 122nd over but missed it and the ball struck the right side of the helmet.

Sarwate, batting on 60, fell at the crease as Bengal team members rushed before he was attended by support staff.

Sarwate soon resumed batting but, after facing three balls, he felt dizzy and was taken off the ground.

“He’s fine and there’s nothing serious,” a Vidarbha team official said after the second day’s proceedings.

Rajneesh Gurbani came to face the last ball of the eventful over as Sarwate was being attended at the dressing room.

Gurbani fell for 4 and Vidarbha lost two more wickets in top-scorer Sanjay Ramaswamy (182) and Akshay Wakhare (12). Sarwate then showed grit to resume his innings in the 133rd over. Sarwate, however, was dismissed for 89 by Porel.

Brief Scores (Group D):
Vidarbha 499 in 138.1 overs (Sanjay Ramaswamy 182, Faiz Fazal 142, Aditya Sarwate 89; Ishan Porel 4/139, Ashok Dinda 3/116) vs Bengal 89/3 in 24 overs (Manoj Tiwary 36*).
Himachal Pradesh 175 vs Chhattisgarh 389/6 in 120 overs (Rishabh Tiwari 131, Amandeep Khare 78, Ashutosh Singh 54).
Services 263 in 107.2 overs (Vikas Yadav 84, Nakul Verma 64; Heramb Parab 3/37, Amogh Desai 3/18) vs Goa 150/6 in 69.3 overs (Sagun Kamat 50; Sachidanand Pandey 3/23).

Tamil Nadu in driver’s seat

Riding on centuries by B Aparajith and all-rounder Vijay Shankar, Tamil Nadu piled on 530/8 and declared their first innings on the second day of their Group C encounter.

The hosts reached 36/0 at draw of stumps.

Resuming at overnight 292/3, which was built on Murali Vijay’s 140, Tamil Nadu consolidated their innings with Aparajith remaining unbeaten on 109 and Shankar scoring 100 runs despite losing B Indrajith for 46 early.

Aparajith, who joined Shankar, ensured that the team scored at a brisk pace and added 177 runs.

Shankar, who struck nine fours and a six, fell after reaching his three-figure mark becoming leg-before wicket to Biplab Samantaray. It was Shankar’s fifth Ranji Trophy ton.

Aparajith, who raised his second century of the season studded with nine boundaries and a six, played confidently and stepped up the tempo as the side looked for quick runs.

Young all-rounder MS Washington Sundar didn’t last too long but he hit three boundaries before falling for 14 and V Yomahesh, who made a comeback to first-class cricket in the game against Mumbai, got out for a duck.

Aparajith and K Vignesh added 26 runs before the Tamil Nadu captain declared the innings.

In reply, Odisha openers Sandeep Pattanaik and Natraj Behera saw off the 13 overs, scoring 36 runs in the process.

Brief Scores (Group C):
Tamil Nadu 530/8 decl in 165 overs (Murali Vijay 140, N Jagadeesan 88, Vijay Shankar 100, B Aparajith 109*, B Indrajith 46, Suryakanth Pradhan 3/75) vs Odisha 36/0 in 13 overs.
Andhra 402 in 144 overs (DB Prashanth Kumar 133, G Hanuma Vihari 62, Ricky Bhui 74, A K Sarkar 5/68) vs Tripura 68/1 in 33 overs (SM Singha 33*).
Mumbai 171 in 56.2 overs (Aditya Tare 50, Atit Sheth 5/50, Lukman Meriwala 5/52) vs Baroda 376/4 in 115 overs (Vishnu Solanki 32, Aditya Waghmode 136, Deepak Hooda 75, Swapnil Singh 63*, Roystan Dias 1/16).

Binny hits ton as Karnataka score 649

All-rounder Stuart Binny scored a fine century while Shreyas Gopal hit a splendid 92 as Karnataka put on a massive 649 in their first innings against Delhi on the second day of a Group A match.

At the close of play, Delhi were 20/0 in five overs with openers Unmukt Chand and skipper Gautam Gambhir batting on 8 and 12, respectively.

Karnataka resumed the day on 348/4 with Binny, starting at his overnight score of 14, hammered 72 runs in only boundaries during his brilliant knock of 118 runs off 155 deliveries.

But, another overnight batsman Mayank Agarwal was run out after adding just seven runs to his last night’s score of 169. He departed for a well-made 176 off 250 balls, including 24 fours and three sixes.

After Agarwal’s departure, Binny adopted an aggressive approach and scored runs quickly in the able company of wicketkeeper-batsman CM Gautam, who also chipped in with an important 46 off 81 balls with eight boundaries.

The duo stitched together a crucial 111-run partnership for the sixth wicket.

Brief Scores (Group A):
Karnataka 1st innings: 649 all out (Mayank Agarwal 176, Stuart Binny 118, Gopal Shreyas 92; Vikas Mishra 3/152, Manan Sharma 3/151) vs Delhi 1st innings: 20/0.
Maharashtra 1st innings: 481 all out (Rohit Motwani 189; Amit Mishra 4/98, Karan Thakur 4/114) vs Railways 1st innings: 80/0 (Shivkant Shukla 43*).
UP 1st innings: 349 all out (Saurab Kumar 133, Upendra Yadav 127; Rajjakuddin Ahmed 3/103) vs Assam 1st innings: 279/6 (Sibsankar Roy 72, Rishav Das 52; Saurabh Kumar 4/54).

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